Hot Pink, High Heels, & Explosions

Lap Band Food and Fitness

So this lap band and I have had one long strange trip.  As I’ve written about before (look HERE and HERE) I am, in reality, a lap band success.  I’ve dropped about 10 clothing sizes give or take (I currently range from a size 10-14/M-XL depending on the brand, cut, and make of an article of clothing); and I’ve lost at least 125 pounds and kept it off.  Like all women (er most at least) I bounce around with my actual weight — fluctuating 10-20 pounds depending on the season and how many craps I have to give (currently, not many FYI).

However, while I have found out that my dress size does not equal happiness (in fact, when I was at my smallest I had a nasty tendency to have mini-blackouts while teaching fitness classes and even literally hit the floor one day) during my retirement as a fitness instructor — I have also realized that I simply am not healthy.  I don’t eat, I don’t feel well, I’m quite tired.  Now grated I also do have quite a bit going out outside of fitness, but you just know when something is off.  So to see if it would help — I gave in and tried the Herbal Cleanse only portion of the Advocare 24 Day challenge.   The Advocare 24 Day challenge starts with a cleanse period where you take a set of pills, drink a fiber shake, chug lots of water, and eat as healthy as possible.  I’ll review that later — but one word of advice I would give is to not try to do a cleanse during a month where you are going to not one but TWO out-of-state conferences.  Not wise, but do-able.

The second portion of the Advocare 24 Day challenge is called the MAX phase.  Here you keep eating clean, but add in a bit of dairy, a meal replacement shake, and the MNS Max3 supplement strips.  While not ideal, I decided to try out the MAX phase separately once I was back in town and on a more regular schedule.  I’ll do a separate review of the Meal Replacement Shake — but this one is just on the MAX3 supplement strips.

Another thing I should say — I am not doing this perfectly.   As a lap band patient I am not a normal challenger.  I am not nom noming on Twinkies and McDonalds.  I am not eating potato chips while watching the teeevee.  Not that all challenges are like that — but I say that because many of the success stories you may see are from folks who had really really bad eating and fitness habits.  And just like on the Biggest Loser — if you start eating better and working out, you will most likely feel better and see weight loss.  I have a band that prohibits me from eating like a normal person, but enough vanity where I manage to keep my favorite Oreo’s out of my house because I will eat them and gain weight.  My band is also why I am plateaued for weight loss — I don’t eat.  Here me now — to lose weight you still must eat!  So,  again I say this simply so you are aware — I am not eating the way you should on this, I have not weighed myself, I did not take a before and after photo –because right now I am trying the supplements to feel good enough to try to rework my diet and fitness.  I have to make it to the starting line first, before I begin the race.

 

Now that I’ve taken care of that…lets tackle this:

 

 

Oy. ve.

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What’s in your food that’s good for you?

15. 04. 2013

I struggle with this on a regular bais. 325lb+ me would have been elated to be the size that I am. Thanks to fitspo, thinspo, and even people in my life who talk about my size and weight — I am always trying to be thinner and fitter. Not for me, not in a health way — but to “fit in”. Thanks to Kate for putting my feelings into words.

*** This post appears on a blog that I am required to write for a class that at this point in the semester I only marginally tolerate.  However — I thought it was a good post.  That and it took me long enough to write I thought I should get a few more miles out of it.  We are required to write in a “What; So What; Now What” format — which you will see below.  However — the point is that we have a major policy issue on our hands.  Food insecurity.  What in the hell we do with it — I don’t know.  As you can see from the end, I’m mad as hell and I don’t have an answer. This problem is not as simplistic as organizational change.  It won’t be solved by taking a personality inventory on how you solve problems.  This is a real issue — where real people in this nation are hungry, sometimes hungry, or are unhealthy due to their ability to purchase foods [that is not just obesity, but also developmentally challenged due to malnutrition].  So what do we do — and is the nation hungry enough to care about this issue? ****

 

What?:

For most Americans — the idea of hunger conjures up a photo of a modern day Christian missionary in sub-sahara Africa.  The man or woman is pleading with you to open your purse and sponsor a child for a few cents a day.  Then they pan to a small child who looks completely emaciated and devastated. Videos like the one above are truly heartbreaking. However, is this the only face of hunger?  Is this the only face of people who are searching for their next meal?  No.

“I have enough to pay my rent, but not enough for food.” –“Who’s Hungry in America” Second Harvest

There are people right here in the greatest Nation, who are hungry and/or food insecure.  As of 2006, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has introduced language to describe various ranges of food security and insecurity.  The USDA now defines food insecurity as: “the condition assessed in the food security survey and represented in USDA food security reports–is a household-level economic and social condition of limited or uncertain access to adequate food.”  Hunger is defined by the USDA as: “an individual-level physiological condition that may result from food insecurity.” (Source: USDA Economic Research Service, “Definition of Food Security“)   The ranges the USDA has adopted are as follows:

Food Security: High food security (old label=Food security): no reported indications of food-access problems or limitations; Marginal food security (old label=Food security): one or two reported indications–typically of anxiety over food sufficiency or shortage of food in the house. Little or no indication of changes in diets or food intake. Food Insecurity: Low food security (old label=Food insecurity without hunger): reports of reduced quality, variety, or desirability of diet. Little or no indication of reduced food intake.  Very low food security (old label=Food insecurity with hunger): Reports of multiple indications of disrupted eating patterns and reduced food intake. [SOURCE]

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